Question: What Type Of Hypersensitivity Reaction Is Serum Sickness?

What type of reaction is serum sickness?

Serum sickness is an immune-complex-mediated hypersensitivity reaction that classically presents with fever, rash, polyarthritis or polyarthralgias.

It was first recognized as an entity in the early 1900s in patients who had received heterologous antisera, which was historically used to treat infectious diseases..

Is serum sickness serious?

While it can cause serious symptoms, serum sickness typically goes away on its own within a week to six weeks. If you’ve recently taken medication containing nonhuman proteins and are having symptoms, contact your doctor as soon as possible.

How do you treat serum sickness?

Treatment for serum sickness is aimed at reducing symptoms. Your doctor may prescribe antihistamines or analgesics (NSAIDs), along with topical medications to relieve itching or rash. In serious cases, your doctor may prescribe corticosteroids, such as prednisone. Normally, there is no need for hospitalization.

How do you get serum sickness?

Serum sickness is an immune response that’s similar to an allergic reaction. It happens when antigens (substances that trigger an immune response) in certain medications and antiserums cause your immune system to react. The antigens involved in serum sickness are proteins from nonhuman sources — usually animals.

What is Arthus type hypersensitivity?

Arthus reaction is a hypersensitivity-reaction that occurs several hours to days following the intradermal injection of a vaccine into an animal. It is marked by the formation of antigen-antibody complexes, accompanied by localized inflammation, pain, redness, and sometimes tissue destruction.

How common is serum sickness?

One of the most common types of medication that causes serum sickness is antivenom. This is given to people who’ve been bitten by a venomous snake. In a review of five U.S. studies, the reported range of serum sickness after antivenom treatment is between 5 and 23 percent.

What is type II hypersensitivity?

Type II Hypersensitivity (Cytotoxic Hypersensitivity) … Type II hypersensitivity reactions are mediated by antibodies directed against antigens on the surface of tissue or cells so that the tissue or cell is destroyed or the function of the cell is altered.

Does serum sickness get worse?

Prognosis/Possible Complications. Serum sickness usually improves in 7 to 10 days, with full recovery in 2 to 4 weeks. However, it may lead to nervous system disorders and a life-threatening allergic reaction called anaphylaxis, so it is important to get medical treatment.

What causes rash and nausea?

Signs of Allergies. Food allergies are the most likely allergies to cause nausea and/or vomiting. … Histamine can cause a variety of symptoms, including rash, headache, sneezing, runny nose and swelling — and in the case of food allergies, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

How do you test for serum sickness?

The following studies are indicated in patients with serum sickness:CBC with differential – Leukocytosis or leukopenia, eosinophilia, or mild thrombocytopenia.Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels – Usually slightly elevated.Urinalysis – Proteinuria, hematuria, active sediment.More items…•

Is serum sickness an autoimmune disease?

Serum sickness is an immune complex–mediated hypersensitivity reaction characterized by fever, rash, arthritis, arthralgia, and other systemic symptoms. … With regard to patient education on serum sickness, the patient and his or her family should be advised of the nature of the offending agent.

How long does serum sickness reaction last?

Serum sickness usually improves in 7 to 10 days, with full recovery in 2 to 4 weeks. However, it may lead to nervous system disorders and a life-threatening allergic reaction called anaphylaxis, so it is important to get medical treatment.

What is a Type 1 hypersensitivity reaction?

Type I hypersensitivity (or immediate hypersensitivity) is an allergic reaction provoked by re-exposure to a specific type of antigen referred to as an allergen. Type I is distinct from type II, type III and type IV hypersensitivities. Exposure may be by ingestion, inhalation, injection, or direct contact.

Can you get serum sickness from a bee sting?

Delayed Reaction to an Insect Sting Reactions occurring more than four hours after a bee or other insect sting are classified as delayed reactions. There have been isolated reports of serum sickness-like syndromes occurring about a week after a sting.

What is acute serum sickness?

Serum sickness is an immune-complex-mediated hypersensitivity reaction that classically presents with fever, rash, polyarthritis or polyarthralgias. It was first recognized as an entity in the early 1900s in patients who had received heterologous antisera, which was historically used to treat infectious diseases.